Tag Archives: Virtual exhibitions

A choice of languages

The new navigation menu at Rechtshistorie, 2015

A year ago I wrote here about my efforts to repair the bilingual interface of my website Rechtshistorie. Due to a technical problem caused by the very progress of the engine behind it the navigation menu offering access in both English and Dutch had broken down definitely. I decided not to test online possible successors to the defunct multilingual tool, but to try things first on a standalone computer. You can imagine me sifting the advertisements of promising tools, making them work or deciding to go elsewhere instead of creating havoc, and facing solutions that either looked bad or could be handled only with the utmost care and precaution. During the past twelve months I did copy all changes and additions in the English version also into the Dutch version.

This weekend I have finally launched a new multilingual menu that seems to me easy to use and maintain. The language switchers are now part of the navigation menu. I have deleted the menu in the right sidebar. When you hover over the menu items pages linked to them will show themselves as before.

Preparing the future

My plans for further pages are not sleeping in a drawer! Such new pages are often a sequel to posts on my blog. Many changes and additions stem from blog posts, too. However, it takes time to prepare these new pages, not just for the research involved, but also for creating a lucid presentation that does justice to a subject.

The last major change on my website is the new order of presentation on the page for digital libraries. In the past I presented digital libraries from some seventy countries in alphabetical order. I have created a new version where you can find countries on their respective continents. The major benefit is easier navigation to a particular country, and a better view of the relative and absolute prominence of digital libraries in particular regions of the world. A major drawback is the preponderance of information about European countries, now much more visible. More than twenty of the seventy countries covered are in Europe. In my defence I would like to consider the fact that you will feel hard pressed to find similar overviews elsewhere. The challenge in creating my overview is for many countries to find anything which really should be included here. Any useful additions are most welcome!

The situation on my page with virtual exhibitions is roughly similar to my digital libraries page. Here the number of countries is not yet as large to make a reordering necessary. Lately I have added a number of links to interesting virtual exhibitions. Especially as a teaching tool or for the first reconnaissance of a theme or subject virtual exhibitions can be most useful. In fact some virtual exhibitions are explicitly meant to be companions to text books.

Logo Pro Memorie

I am sorry that I have to conclude here with an announcement about Rechtsgeschiedenis, the partner website of Rechtshistorie. The content management system behind this website of the Foundation for Old Dutch Law showed all kind of defects, and it had to be taken down. The essential information about the foundation will eventually reappear, either at the new website for its scholarly journal Pro Memorie. Bijdragen tot de rechtsgeschiedenis der Nederlanden or at a renewed version of Rechtsgeschiedenis.org. Uitgeverij Verloren, the publisher of Pro Memorie, will start this year with digitizing older issues. Let’s hope that Dutch legal historians will soon succeed in reviving and renewing their website, or that they will build a basic website around the journal. The example of the Flemish website for legal history at Ghent will surely be a spur to create a new web team and work together closely with legal historians in Belgium.

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Centers of legal history: the Robbins Collection

First of all an apology: I have been just too busy this month with other activities and duties, including work on my new website, to publish new posts on this blog. Today’s post might offer you some solace…

The Robbins Collection

Perhaps you know already about the Robbins Collection at Boalt Hall, the library for legal history of the University of California at Berkeley. This library started in 1952. In 1970 Stephan Kuttner, the founder of the Institute of Medieval Canon Law, now in Munich, became its director. The Robbins Collection with over 300,000 volumes is not just one collection, it brings together collections on civil law, religious law and comparative law. One of its strengths is the collection of European law books from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. In the field of religious law you will find not only works on canon law, the law system of the Catholic church, but also on Jewish and Islamic law. The Robbins Collection offered from 1970 a fitting surrounding for David Daube, the most versatile scholar of legal history of his generation. For Daube no boundaries existed between research on history, law systems and religions: the essays in the commemorative issue from 2004 of the online journal Roman Legal Tradition will give you some idea of the sheer width of Daube’s research. The Robbins Collection has its own publication series in which the collected articles of Daube have been published. On the website of the library you get an impression of some of the books in the rich collections: there are online exhibitions on The Medieval Law School and The Roman-Dutch Legal Tradition; you can also consult the manuscript and incunables catalogue online. Manuscripts from the collections can be seen on the Digital Scriptorium, a website originally at Berkeley but recently moved to Columbia University, New York. The Robbins Collection organizes regularly conferences and lectures on legal history.

An addendum: thanks to Mike Widener (Yale University) I was alerted to another online exhibition at the website of the Robbins Collection, called Milestones in Legal Culture and Traditions which offers a general introduction to the various collections at Boalt Hall. It seems now I had simply overlooked the general link to the exhibits on the Robbins Collection website. A fourth exhibit from 2008 was held on Famous Trials and their Legacies. A fifth exhibit from 2012 presents California’s Legal Heritage, with links to digitized books.

After a period in which these exhibits seemed to have disappeared they resurfaced again in 2018. The manuscripts catalogue is now available as a searchable database.